Black-and-white-casqued Hornbill (Bycanistes subcylindricus)

J.F.L Van Duinen

This species is commonly seen in Kenya especially around Tugen Hills, Kakamega Forest and Cherangani Hills. It is an easy species to identify and birders will have less difficulty spotting this species even in primary forest habitat as its flight betray his presence.These birds are mostly frugivorous, with the fruits of Ficus trees composing more than half of their diet. Overall, they are known to eat the fruits of over 41 plant genera, which they forage by hopping from branch to branch in the rainforest canopy and reaching for fruit with the tip of the bill, which they then swallow whole. They also consume birds, eggs, insects, bats, snails, lizards, molluscs, other small animal prey, mosses, lichens, and fungi. Sexual dimorphism is exhibited by these species, and male tend to be slightly bigger than their female counter parts.

November 2013 and January 2014 Scheduled Birding Trip to North and Western Kenya Birding Trip

This 17 days trip will take you to Nairobi, Mt. Kenya region,Samburu, Lake Nakuru, Lake Baringo, Kakamega, Lake Victoria, Masai Mara and Lake Naivasha. Some of the highlight species expected on the this include;Turner’s Eremomela, Abbot’s Starling, and Sharpes’s Longclaw, Rufous-bellied Heron,Allen’s Gallinule, Hartlaub’s Bustard, White-crested, Great Blue and Black-billed Turaco, White-faced Scops Owl, Gambaga Flycatcher and Boran Cisticola

Friedmann’s Lark (Mirafra pulpa)

Friedmann's Lark (Mirafra pulpa)

Photo@Joseph Aengwo

Friedmann’s Lark is a rare bird resembling Singing Bush Lark but more richly coloured and more heavily streaked above, especially on nape and upper back, streaking enhanced in fresh plumage by broad pale feather edges; superciliary stripes somewhat  less prominent . Singing birds readily distinguished vocally and y prominent white throat. Gregarious territorial birds share habitat with Singing Bush Lark, Red-winged and Flappet Lark.It has a tendency of elevating crown feathers when singing, leaning forwards and fluffing out  the white throat. Tsavo West and East National Park are the only places you have an high chance of seeing them.